Friday, 30 March 2018

DOUBTS OVER PROPOSED NEW WETLAND RESERVE ON OUTSKIRTS OF GRIMSBY

Shoveler - a species that might be attracted to
  the proposed reserve
 

THERE has been a setback to ambitious plans for a dedicated Special Protection Area to be created for wader and wildfowl  on the outskirts of Grimsby.

National Grid has submitted  a holding objection to the Cress Marsh project because the proposed wetland is crossed by  both an underground  high-pressure gas pipeline and a high-voltage transmission overhead line.

This has created a potential hazard, particularly during all-important preliminary earthworks to  the application site which is adjacent to  Poplar Farm off South Marsh Road in Stallingborough.

The scheme has also been jeopardised by concerns expressed by neighbours that their property or land might be adversely affected by flooding  or drainage issues.
One of the objectors is the agent for  Sir Richard Sutton Ltd, a company whose substantial interests are understood to include not just adjacent  land but also part of the  site proposed for the reserve (which would also accommodate a hide for birds to be watched and recorded).

These glitches are not insurmountable, but they are likely both to delay the project and to add to its cost.


On the plus side, there has been no objection from Humberside Airport which is located at Kirmington.

The site falls just within its 13km airport “bird zone", and its aerodrome safeguarding officer  has requested to be consulted on wildlife-monitoring processes to reduce the  birdstrike risk.

The applicants, North East Lincolnshire Council, are particularly anxious that the wetland scheme should progress because it represents the  wildlife mitigation required for proposed development of the wider area for industry.

More discussions will be held between NELC planners and objectors.

Thursday, 29 March 2018

WAIT CONTINUES FOR UNVEILING OF PRECIOUS CLEETHORPES LANDMARK

                                                    
Today's picture - scaffolding and netting surrounds the clock tower

THE clock tower at Cleethorpes Railway Station still has not been unveiled  following its recent renovation.
 
As of last year, it  had been hoped that refurbishment and reinstatement of the historic structure might be possible on site, but experts  decided that the extent of rot in the woodwork meant it required a more radical approach.

Planners therefore granted Network Rail listed building consent for its temporary removal. 


There was speculation that the work had been completed and that the clock tower would be on view, restored to its glory of yesteryear, in time for the Easter weekend.

But as of today, Good Friday,  that was not  the case.

While the wait continues. the refurbishment  initiative for such an important landmark has been welcomed by the Civic Society and by Historic England.      
 
The  much-loved landmark shortly before its removal

The Grade II listed clock tower has historic as well as architectural interest because it dates back to 1884 when, along with the adjacent refreshment rooms, it was created  by  Lockerbie  and  Wilkinson,  of  Birmingham, for the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway Company.

Says Historic England: "The magnificent and ornate clock tower, which rises to four stages, forms an intrinsic part of the building’s significance and is a landmark within Cleethorpes and the conservation area.

"It signifies the importance of the railway to Cleethorpes as a predominantly Victorian seaside resort which expanded after 1863 when the railway arrived at  the station which was built right by the beach.

"The clock tower was  found to be in very poor condition, and we understand that it was partly removed for reasons of public safety.

"Substantial areas of rotted wood timber, including structural timbers, needed to be replaced."

Accoya wood has been chosen for the refurbishment  due to its structural integrity, durability and  lifespan.

Once painted, the choice of wood will have no impact upon the appearance of the clock tower but will increase its longevity

The project has also included reinstatement of features which have gone missing over the passage of time.
                                        
Above and below; As yet, the mission is still unaccomplished
            

PLANNING THUMBS-UP FOR TWO NEW HOMES ON HUMBERSTON PADDOCK DESPITE PROTESTS FROM NEIGHBOURS

THE planning green light has been given for two houses and a car-parking barn to
be built in a horse paddock in Humberston.

North East Lincolnshire Council has approved an application by Steve Dixon to
develop the site which is at the top end of South Sea Lane where existing barns
are currently being converted for residential use.

Consent was granted today despite objections from near neighbours unhappy
both about homes being built on a greenfield site and about a potential traffic
hazard because of the narrow single-lane access.

Agent for the project is Dieter Nelson.

Monday, 5 March 2018

CHANCE TO BID FOR A SLICE OF CLEETHORPES THEME PARK HISTORY

BIDDING is likely to be brisk when the contents of the former Pleasure Island theme park in Cleethorpes go under the hammer this week.

Everything from rides to fruit machines, from distorting mirrors  to catering equipment are up for on-site auction on Wednesday and Thursday.

The event is being organised and staged by Grimsby-based Prestige Auctions.

Meanwhile, there is still a question mark over what will happen to the seafront  site itself  once it has been cleared.

There is speculation that supermarket chains such as Lidl have run the sliderule over the former amusement park, but it could also attract interest from caravan park operators.
                                    
One of many  signs that are  up for grabs

Your chance to buy a bumper car

Who will give a home to these cuddly snowmen . . .?

. . . or these forlorn and forgotten soldiers

Wednesday, 28 February 2018

SNOWY SCENES IN CLEETHORPES ON THE LAST DAY OF FEBRUARY


Pupils at Signhills Academy play snowballs under a threatening sky

A blackbird struggles to find a peck to eat

All the fun of toboganning in the country park

A true angler - one keen to  fish in all weathers
 
A view down Bradford Avenue
Scene of stillness in the country park

                                                Dark skies above the boating lake
                                               
Gulls at rest on the icy surface of the boating lake
                                                                                                                                                                   

A view up Hey Street

Wednesday, 21 February 2018

CLEETHORPES KFC HIT BY SHORTAGE OF SOMETHING RATHER IMPORTANT - CHICKEN!

                                           
LIKE some 700 other restaurants in KFC's 900-strong UK chain, the branch (pictured) opposite Cleethorpes Boating Lake has been hit bya delivery shortfall in  its most important commodity - chicken.

Earlier this winter, the parent company awarded the supply contract to Rugby-based DHL after dispensing with the services of Bidvest, butDHL  has failed to meet the challenge. It has literally been unable to deliver.

It is thought that the Cleethorpes branch is a franchisee and its operator will thus probably  be entitled to compensation from DHL (which is owned by the German company, Deutsche Post).

KFC's on-the-bone chicken is all sourced from British producers, while its boneless chicken comes from various European countries, plus some further afield such as Brazil and Thailand. 

It is not known when normal service will be resumed.

A sign on the door blames "teething problems" for the limited menu

Monday, 12 February 2018

CRUNCH PLANNING DECISION SOON ON RESORT'S PROPOSED NEW LIFEBOAT STATION

                                                 
The proposed structure will transform the look of the seafront


A PLANNING decision is due to be made soon on a proposed new lifeboat station for Cleethorpes.

The proposal for a larger, more modern premises first surfaced in October 2014, but it is only now that Decision Day looms.

If approved the venture (designed by Lancaster-based Thomas Associates Architects) could transform the look of the resort's central foreshore  by virtue of  a  new elevated structure and slipway running over the top of what is one of the most popular parts of the sandy beach.

One of the consultees is Natural England which has expressed misgivings both about the health and safety of beach-users and the potentially adverse impact on the knot, sanderling, godwit and other wading birds for whom the intertidal habitat provides a vital feeding habitat, especially in winter and at migration times.

However, there have been few objections from the community who acknowledge the importance of the RNLI and their brave work in going to the aid of those in peril on the sea.

Full details of the proposal have been posted on the planning page of North East Lincolnshire Council's website, and members of  the public are welcome to submit responses during the course of this month.

It is not yet known if the decision will be made  by an NELC/engie officer under delegated powers or by NELC's planning committee.